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Siamese Cat Weight By Age – Full Guide

There’s just something about Siamese cats. While all cats are graceful, Siamese kitties seem to have gotten a little bonus grace in their step and coupled with their elegant features and loving personalities, they are definitely a breed that is impossible to resist.

Today we’re going to tell you a little about what you can expect as far as their size and weight, but we’ll also go into their specific diets, as well as some health conditions that you’ll want to be on the lookout for. Let’s talk about your Siamese cat and what to expect as they grow!

Siamese Cat Weight By Age

Siamese Cat Weight By Age

Getting started, we want to make sure that we set proper expectations and let you know that the weights that’s we’ve collected to list for you are merely an average, to give you a basic foundation of what to expect.

Siamese cats, like other cats, can come in bigger or smaller sizes, and they all have their own preferred activity levels. That said, on average a male weighs 10-15 pounds fully grown, while a female is typically 8-12 pounds. The males tend to be taller as well, typically by around 2 inches/5 cm, and about 11 -14 inches fully grown.

While Siamese cats tend to stay thin, as they are mostly indoor cats you’ll want to make sure that they have plenty of toys and area to play around in, as there is still a risk of obesity if your Siamese cat isn’t getting enough exercise.

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Siamese Cat Weight By Age

Finally, aside from the projection data that we’ll give you today, we recommend that you check with your breeder if your Siamese cat came from one. Ask if you can see the parents or at least have their weight and height measurements and this can give you a pretty good idea of their eventual height and weight.

Siamese Cat Weight Chart

Now that we’ve gotten that our of the way, let’s take a look at some approximation of your cat’s weight as they get older. Again, these are just estimates — don’t start any dietary changes without your vet’s recommendation. A cat that is too thin or too heavy needs a vet checkup first to rule out potential health issues.

How Much Should My Siamese Cat Weigh? Here is an at-a-glance growth approximation chart for this breed:

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Siamese Cat Weight By Age
Siamese Growth rate – 3 months to 3 yearsMale Siamese CatsFemale Siamese Cats
3 months  average weight2 – 4 pounds/ .9 – 1.8 kilos2 -3 Pounds/.9 – 1.37 kilos
6 months3 – 5 pounds/1.37 – 2.26 kilos3 – 4 pounds/1.37 -1.8 kilos
9 months6 – 8 pounds/2.72 – 3.62 kilos5 – 7 Pounds/2.26 – 3.17 kilos
1 year7 – 9 pounds/3.17 – 4.08 kilos6 – 9 pounds/2.72 – 4.08 kilos
3 years10-15 pounds/4.53 – 7.25 kilos8-12 pounds/3.62 – 5.44 kilos

With Siamese cats, you’ll typically see a 3-pound difference between the average top healthy weight of the male. Simply put, males usually ‘top out’ at 15 pounds, while females will usually weigh around 12 pounds. The males tend to be a bit taller, but it’s all going to boil down to their DNA.

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Every now and again, you’ll end up with small male and a tall female, though if your Siamese cat is a rescue that wasn’t neutered or spayed early, they will almost always be much smaller as this affects their growth rate. Wild/feral cats grow slowly, due to the high activity levels outside and needing to hunt for all of their meals.

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Siamese Cat Weight By Age

Variables that can affect your Siamese’s weight gain

There are a number of factors that can come into play to help determine the size your Siamese cat will be when they are fully grown. There is the DNA factor, of course, but if rescued your cat from a shelter then the parent’s measurements may not be available to you. Next, however, is a manageable factor and that is nutrition.

Siamese kitties can be a bit smaller if they are not getting enough protein or overall nutrition, but we’ll go into that in a little more detail in a section of its own. If your Siamese cat was feral or a rescue kitty, then a smaller frame can also be due to being weaned too early, and this will typically show also in behaviors.

If you notice that your cat is competitive with other cats in the house for food or tends to gobble their own up fairly quickly, then early weaning is a definite possibility. Cats learn socialization skills from their mom and their siblings, and so an early separation can definitely have an impact on size and their behavior.

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Siamese Cat Weight By Age

Finally, on the flipside, since Siamese cats are almost always kept as indoor kitties, it will be up to you to make sure that they are getting enough exercise. Having lots of toys available helps, but scheduled playtime is also a good idea. A bored Siamese may start sleeping more than usual and obesity can definitely become a risk.

Counting your cat’s calories for proper nutrition

Siamese cats need a lot of protein and most vets will recommend that you use a high protein and grain free cat food. Wet food is preferable, but if you are on a budget you can always boil a little water and optionally add a chicken bouillon cube to it (salt free only) and pour a little into their food.

Let it sit for 2 to 3 minutes and it will expand, giving you ‘wet food on a budget’. Calories, your Siamese cat needs 40 to 50 calories per every 2 pounds/.9 kilos of their actual weight in order to maintain their current healthy weight. This comes out to 200 -250 calories a day for a 10 pound/4.5 kilo Siamese cat.

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Siamese Cat Weight By Age

The frequency with which you should feed them will actually be different depending on their age. Adult Siamese cats can be fed twice a day, so each bowl would have 100-125 calories, or if the cat is a Siamese kitten or simply not yet an adult, 3 to 4 meals a day is the better option.

If you want to use that schedule but it’s not going to match well with your work schedule, you might consider investing in an automatic feeder. These will open at preset times per day, so that your cat is served meals on the schedule that you select for them, even when you’re away at work.  

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Care considerations for the Siamese breed

With Siamese cats, once you’ve got their diet down, you’ll want to make sure that you are including their treats in their daily calories and the easiest way to keep track is to evaluate the calories in their favorite treats to find the ones with the smallest impact.

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Siamese Cat Weight By Age

If your Siamese cat is getting thin and you can tell that they are only ‘nibbling’ at their food for brief periods of time, then you might want to bring them into the vet to check for gingivitis (despite the healthy weight gain or loss). Siamese cats are prone to this, though you can help to keep this at bay by brushing their teeth on occasion to help. Keep in mind that all cat breeds are different and all cat breeds will require an individual approach.

Aside from gingivitis, these cats are also prone to heart disease and glaucoma as Siamese cats get older, but as long as you are keeping up with vet visits every 3 months then you should be able to catch these conditions early so that they will not affect your kitty’s health.

If your cat is one year old and they still seem a little small, don’t panic – while most Siamese are fully grown at one year, some actually don’t stop growing until the 2 year mark, so this is a final thing to keep in mind if you’re worried about your cat’s size.

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Siamese Cat Weight By Age

Bonus tips about your Siamese’s diet

If you notice that your young Siamese kittens seem to be vomiting a lot, then you’ll want to get them in to see the vet as soon as possible. Siamese cats can suffer from pyloric stenosis, most often when they are kittens, and this disease causes a narrowing of their stomach that makes food harder to properly digest.

While this is not a common condition, Siamese cats are predisposed towards it more than standard housecats, and it’s something to keep on the lookout for. It is pretty rare, but we would be amiss if we did not mention this.

Aside from being aware of pyloric stenosis, your cat’s diet is actually going to be pretty much the same as a standard housecat, just with a little extra protein which will help to ensure that your cat is getting enough nutrition for their activity level.

A fun way to help your Siamese get some quality time with you (that just happens to include exercise) is to teach your Siamese cat to fetch. This breed is quite clever and if you make a tradition of playing fetch at the end of you workday then they’ll burn some extra calories and you’ll both have a great time!

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Siamese Cat Weight By Age

Some closing words on Siamese cats

Now that you know what to expect, just remember that we are simply giving you averages based on statistical data at our disposal. DNA and other factors such as spaying or neutering can definitely make a difference and as your cat is an individual, sometimes they’ll simply be smaller or larger and it’s still completely normal.

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If you are worried about their weight, the best thing to do is to simply bring them in for a quick checkup. Your vet can rule out any health issues and if a change in diet is required, then you’ll be able to get on top of it right away.

Now that you know what to expect as your kitty gets older, we wish you a healthy Siamese cat at the very best and healthy weight!